Maybe it’s just in America, but it seems that if you’re passionate about something, it freaks people out. You’re considered bizarre or eccentric. To me, it just means you know who you are.

Tim Burton (via bettychantel)

Sadly it seems to be like that around the world.

(via sci-universe)

(via sci-universe)

Don’t be seduced into thinking that that which does not make a profit is without value.
Arthur Miller (via wordsnquotes)

(via edwardspoonhands)

ambitiousgurl1:

College is viewed as a necessity, yet priced as a luxury.

(via epic-humor)

stanfordbusiness:

Kenneth “Hap” Klopp (MBA ‘66), the former head of The North Face, shares three pieces of advice for entrepreneurs: http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/news/headlines/kenneth-hap-klopp-focus-value-not-price #StanfordGSBAlumni

stanfordbusiness:

Kenneth “Hap” Klopp (MBA ‘66), the former head of The North Face, shares three pieces of advice for entrepreneurs: 
http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/news/headlines/kenneth-hap-klopp-focus-value-not-price #StanfordGSBAlumni

(via goodideaexchange)

Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (via philosophy-quotes)

(via goodideaexchange)

If you let people work you to death, they will.
How To Disconnect From Work Without Everyone Freaking Out (via fastcompany)
The important thing in life is not to have a good hand but to play it well.
Louis Fortin (via everydaymermaid)

(via goodideaexchange)

goodideaexchange:

Find out what’s uniquely special about yourself. Then share that insight with the world. That’s how you effectively influence people.

- Brandon

Sometimes you have to slow down to go faster.
Tim Fry, chair of the global technology practice at Weber Shandwick, shares his best career advice. (via prweek)

(via goodideaexchange)

fastcompany:

Turns out what doesn’t kill you really does make you stronger.
At the age of 23, Alan Lock, a junior officer in the British Royal Navy, began to experience impaired vision. An eye test revealed he had macular degeneration and would be legally blind within a month.
The Royal Navy had no choice but to discharge Lock from his post—one that he had dreamed of since he was a child. Forced to give up on his career, Lock refused to give up on life and set his mind on a new goal and became the first legally blind person to row a boat across the Atlantic Ocean. He later became the first blind person to trek across Antarctica and the first blind person to run the Marathon de Sables in the Sahara. In addition to setting world records, he’s raised thousands of dollars for worthy charities and become a worldwide inspiration.
We all love an amazing comeback story; especially those about someone who recovered from a horrible event that caused them to re-think their entire worldview and purpose and emerged astonishingly successful. Psychologists David B. Feldman and Lee Daniel Kravets call these individuals “supersurvivors.” In their bookSupersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering and Success they argue there are common characteristics of those who are able to turn a traumatic event into a personal success story.
Although the authors are careful to point out they aren’t advocating trauma, they say these individuals are extreme examples of tapping into the resilient nature that lies within all of us. Whether overcoming a traumatic event such as a sudden loss of eyesight or a minor setback such as losing a key client at work, Feldman and Kravets say there are four key traits that make supersurvivors so resilient that we can all learn from:
Read More>

fastcompany:

Turns out what doesn’t kill you really does make you stronger.

At the age of 23, Alan Lock, a junior officer in the British Royal Navy, began to experience impaired vision. An eye test revealed he had macular degeneration and would be legally blind within a month.

The Royal Navy had no choice but to discharge Lock from his post—one that he had dreamed of since he was a child. Forced to give up on his career, Lock refused to give up on life and set his mind on a new goal and became the first legally blind person to row a boat across the Atlantic Ocean. He later became the first blind person to trek across Antarctica and the first blind person to run the Marathon de Sables in the Sahara. In addition to setting world records, he’s raised thousands of dollars for worthy charities and become a worldwide inspiration.

We all love an amazing comeback story; especially those about someone who recovered from a horrible event that caused them to re-think their entire worldview and purpose and emerged astonishingly successful. Psychologists David B. Feldman and Lee Daniel Kravets call these individuals “supersurvivors.” In their bookSupersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering and Success they argue there are common characteristics of those who are able to turn a traumatic event into a personal success story.

Although the authors are careful to point out they aren’t advocating trauma, they say these individuals are extreme examples of tapping into the resilient nature that lies within all of us. Whether overcoming a traumatic event such as a sudden loss of eyesight or a minor setback such as losing a key client at work, Feldman and Kravets say there are four key traits that make supersurvivors so resilient that we can all learn from:

Read More>

(via goodideaexchange)

Most people think happiness is about gaining something, but it’s not. It’s all about getting rid of the darkness you accumulate.
Carolyn Crane (via bhava-bodhi)

(via goodideaexchange)

edwardspoonhands:

vidconblr:

Thumbnails are HUGELY IMPORTANT to the success of a video. YouTube’s algorithm considers how many people click on a video when it shows up as a related video or on the “What to Watch” page, and then how many people go on to watch the full video that is connected to it. A good thumbnail that conveys what your video is about and inspires a click is with every moment of design you can put into it. 
Last year we released a detailed and complicated thumbnail design guide for YouTubers. Since then, A LOT HAS CHANGED, and it’s mostly for the better. 
The best news is that YouTube has standardized all (we think) thumbnail displays (including mobile and post-video) to 16:9. So, hooray, now you only have to design your thumbnails in one aspect ratio! Some applications on Facebook still use 4:3, but it looks fine whether you optimize for that or not.
The biggest issue I have is with the time stamps not being standardized between desktop and mobile…they take up a ton of space and I find it annoying to design around. It’s nice that they’re there for users wanting to know what they’re getting into…I just wish it the desktop and mobile thumbnails displayed the same way.
The title overlay is a little annoying to design around (it only shows up in embeds, as far as I can tell (like here on Tumblr)) but it’s also very nice to have for users who want to know what the video is called and see more information without playing the video.
So I hope this guide is helpful and I just want to say thanks to YouTube for standardizing to 16:9…it’s gonna save SO MUCH HASSLE!

For all my thumbnail designing friends.

edwardspoonhands:

vidconblr:

Thumbnails are HUGELY IMPORTANT to the success of a video. YouTube’s algorithm considers how many people click on a video when it shows up as a related video or on the “What to Watch” page, and then how many people go on to watch the full video that is connected to it. A good thumbnail that conveys what your video is about and inspires a click is with every moment of design you can put into it. 

Last year we released a detailed and complicated thumbnail design guide for YouTubers. Since then, A LOT HAS CHANGED, and it’s mostly for the better. 

The best news is that YouTube has standardized all (we think) thumbnail displays (including mobile and post-video) to 16:9. So, hooray, now you only have to design your thumbnails in one aspect ratio! Some applications on Facebook still use 4:3, but it looks fine whether you optimize for that or not.

The biggest issue I have is with the time stamps not being standardized between desktop and mobile…they take up a ton of space and I find it annoying to design around. It’s nice that they’re there for users wanting to know what they’re getting into…I just wish it the desktop and mobile thumbnails displayed the same way.

The title overlay is a little annoying to design around (it only shows up in embeds, as far as I can tell (like here on Tumblr)) but it’s also very nice to have for users who want to know what the video is called and see more information without playing the video.

So I hope this guide is helpful and I just want to say thanks to YouTube for standardizing to 16:9…it’s gonna save SO MUCH HASSLE!

For all my thumbnail designing friends.